FastCompany: Most Innovative Companies 2014

In this special report on the World’s Most Innovative Companies from FastCompany, there are plenty of examples to make you a believer in the future. To generate our list of the 50 Most Innovative Companies–and the accompanying top 10 companies in various sectors–FastCompany assessed thousands of enterprises. From all that work, They’ve pulled out 12 rising trends. Risk of failure and collapse are always with us. But the culture of innovation across the globe is more robust than ever. We think that’s worth celebrating.

 Read the full article & see the list

The end of audiences segmentation?

Marketing has become so complex, in segmenting audiences into “B2B” (business to business) and “B2C” (business to consumer). Being here in Silicon Valley, surrounded by titans of technology like Google, Facebook, Cisco, Twitter, LinkedIn and eBay to name a few, I’ve observed a downhill slope of complexity in marketing communication. This, plus the rise of social, digital and mobile channels, have created an atmosphere of anonymity, and the entire marketing ecosystem felt like a very cold, distant and impersonal place.

Read more by Bryan Kramer, author of the new ebook: There is no B2B or B2C: Human to Human” and CEO of PureMatter

The future of Marketing?

This week included the Economist Big Rethink conference, The Economist Group.

Here is the conclusions about the challenges of the future of marketing, summarised by David Rogers.

I see six transformative mega-trends that will radically reshape marketing in the very near future:

The addressable customer: Breakthroughs in big data are about to give marketers a revolutionary ability to address each individual on a one-to-one basis across digital platforms. Marketers will be able to follow the same customer from website to app to Twitter to Amazon, and deliver personalized value at every touchpoint. The firms who can pull this off, and measure the true results of their marketing investments, will reap enormous gains.

Technodiversity: Old technologies never die, they just fade into the background (think radio, print books, or email—still a powerful workhorse for customer relationships). While biodiversity is under threat, technodiversity is growing each quarter. While there may be only one Facebook, every day a new Pinterest, Snapchat, or WhatsApp sprouts up in the forest of consumer behavior. Marketers will have to tirelessly learn to engage customers on an ever-diversifying range of media.

Advertising’s hollow middle: Like media markets, and like the labor market, the advertising market is getting squeezed in the middle. On one extreme, real time bidding and other programmatic approaches to ad buying are leading to a huge inventory of cheap ads. On the other extreme, big brands will pay ever-bigger fortunes for unique media opportunities like the Super Bowl or the Oscars. In the middle, I predict the demise of branding by banner ads, particularly on mobile.

Invisible threats: Cyberthreats that used to be the concern of CIOs are going to be front and center for marketers now. Target’s loss of customers after its data breach shows that data security is now a brand reputation issue; Target botched their “Tylenol Moment.” At the same time, botnets are stealing much of the value of marketers’ online media buys through ever-more-sophisticated interception and impersonation.

Two minds of marketing: Marketers realize they need both creatives and scientists to succeed in the data-rich world of marketing today. The model of the future will be “augmented intelligence.” Like the MD’s who have started to work with IBM’s Watson as their virtual assistant in diagnosing cancer patients, marketers will need to effectively join their creative, intuitive, sense-making minds, with the analytical minds of artificial intelligence systems, in order to harness big data in a way that is truly human.

The vanishing CMO: Marketers love to fixate on the average tenure of the CMO at firms (is it going up or is it going down?). My question is: What is the lifespan of the very idea of the Chief Marketing Officer? Today’s CMO’s increasingly find they cannot succeed in their job because they need to also be Chief Information Officers, or Chief Experience Officers, Chief Culture Officers, Chief Strategy Officers, or in some sense Chief Financial Officers (to meet the expectations for demonstrating ROI). Will the role of CMO still exist in 5 or 10 years? Or will it have changed unrecognizably?

Read more 

See your future! … pre-dictables

Predictables- contemporary fortune tellers from Dor_tal on Vimeo.

From the dawn of civilization, man has tried to foretell, predict and forecast his future. From the movement of the stars to modern meteorology, man has searched for patterns that can indicate the imminent future. The project seeks to give a contemporary interpretation to predicting the future in the form of interactive watches that present the user with personalized predictions in different areas of life, such as: career, love friendships and more. The app uses an algorithm that looks for patternsand connections within the stream of data the user produces throughout his life. When it identifies a predictable action, a recommended response
for solving the problem or enhancing the experience is calculated and presented. The interaction with the app is performed through designated projectors that use personal surfaces for presenting the interface.

The end of new? UPGRADIA prolongs life cycles!

In the digital space, endless consumer desire for the new is served by a never-ending stream of updates. One example? Twitter’s iOS app saw an upgrade on November 19 2013 (version 5.13), a further tweak on November 21 2013, another upgrade on December 10 2013 (version 6) and another tweak on December 13 2013.

In this light, standard iteration cycles when it comes to physical products increasingly feel super-slow and uninspiring: “Six months, and all they’ve added is a slightly better camera?”.

At the heart of the UPGRADIA trend is the shifting of expectations that have been cultivated online – of constant upgrade, iteration and improvement – into the physical world.

 

The end of respect? HERITAGE HERESY

A rising numbers of consumers are embracing brands that play with, subvert and even explode their own heritage. You can only start to imagine what they might do to your brands’ heritage …

 

Bizcommunity Trends Report 2014

Every year Bizcommunity.com invites the top commentators, thought leaders and opinion leaders in the advertising, marketing, media, retail and associated industries to submit their views on what will happen in their respective industries in the upcoming year.

 

The Big Rethink!

This week included the Economist Big Rethink conference, The Economist Group.

Here is the conclusions about the challenges of the future of marketing, summarised by David Rogers.

I see six transformative mega-trends that will radically reshape marketing in the very near future:

The addressable customer: Breakthroughs in big data are about to give marketers a revolutionary ability to address each individual on a one-to-one basis across digital platforms. Marketers will be able to follow the same customer from website to app to Twitter to Amazon, and deliver personalized value at every touchpoint. The firms who can pull this off, and measure the true results of their marketing investments, will reap enormous gains.

Technodiversity: Old technologies never die, they just fade into the background (think radio, print books, or email—still a powerful workhorse for customer relationships). While biodiversity is under threat, technodiversity is growing each quarter. While there may be only one Facebook, every day a new Pinterest, Snapchat, or WhatsApp sprouts up in the forest of consumer behavior. Marketers will have to tirelessly learn to engage customers on an ever-diversifying range of media.

Advertising’s hollow middle: Like media markets, and like the labor market, the advertising market is getting squeezed in the middle. On one extreme, real time bidding and other programmatic approaches to ad buying are leading to a huge inventory of cheap ads. On the other extreme, big brands will pay ever-bigger fortunes for unique media opportunities like the Super Bowl or the Oscars. In the middle, I predict the demise of branding by banner ads, particularly on mobile.

Invisible threats: Cyberthreats that used to be the concern of CIOs are going to be front and center for marketers now. Target’s loss of customers after its data breach shows that data security is now a brand reputation issue; Target botched their “Tylenol Moment.” At the same time, botnets are stealing much of the value of marketers’ online media buys through ever-more-sophisticated interception and impersonation.

Two minds of marketing: Marketers realize they need both creatives and scientists to succeed in the data-rich world of marketing today. The model of the future will be “augmented intelligence.” Like the MD’s who have started to work with IBM’s Watson as their virtual assistant in diagnosing cancer patients, marketers will need to effectively join their creative, intuitive, sense-making minds, with the analytical minds of artificial intelligence systems, in order to harness big data in a way that is truly human.

The vanishing CMO: Marketers love to fixate on the average tenure of the CMO at firms (is it going up or is it going down?). My question is: What is the lifespan of the very idea of the Chief Marketing Officer? Today’s CMO’s increasingly find they cannot succeed in their job because they need to also be Chief Information Officers, or Chief Experience Officers, Chief Culture Officers, Chief Strategy Officers, or in some sense Chief Financial Officers (to meet the expectations for demonstrating ROI). Will the role of CMO still exist in 5 or 10 years? Or will it have changed unrecognizably?

Read more!

BIG DATA GETS REAL

The buzz over big data has been nothing short of deafening. It has beckoned with the promise of delivering a better understanding of customers and the overall business. Unfortunately, “There is still a lot of naivety and inexperience; a lot of companies are clueless about how to unlock the value that’s tucked away in their data,” noted M. Eric Johnson, director of the Center for Digital Technology at Dartmouth University, in an interview with CMO.com.

However, better tools and greater knowledge about how to apply big data concepts means the landscape is changing rapidly. Organizations that tear down data silos and create more efficient ways to connect all of the dots will unlock exponential gains over the next few years.

Source: CMO.com

CMOs REDISCOVER TRADITIONAL MEDIA

A funny thing happened on the march to digital marketing: Many CMOs are rediscovering traditional media. In fact, conventional advertising and commercials still represent the largest chunk of the marketplace—about twice as much as digital media advertising in terms of total dollars spent, according to Malaviya. “The bottom line is that TV and print are more important than ever,” Mondelez International’s Bough told CMO.com. “In a world where content is king, TV networks and print publishers are some of the best mass content producers. They are at the forefront of figuring out ways to bring the right content to life at the right time and to the right audience.”

During the next few years, expect television sets to undergo some major changes. Apple is rumored to be developing a digital age set, and other tech giants are studying the concept as well. More effective ways to measure and gauge viewer and reader response (think social media analytics, cross-screen integration, and QR codes) could turn traditional media upside down. Predicted Bough: “Cross-screen integration will become the most powerful strategy available to brand marketers and will give new meaning to the term ‘connected experience.’”

Source: CMO.com